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Race and the Invisible Hand How White Networks Exclude Black Men from Blue-Collar Jobs (George Gund Foundation Book in African American Studies) by Deirdre A. Royster

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  • 54 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Black studies,
  • Equal opportunities,
  • Racism & racial discrimination,
  • Work & labour,
  • Social Science,
  • Employment,
  • Business / Economics / Finance,
  • United States,
  • Labor & Industrial Relations - General,
  • Sociology,
  • USA,
  • Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General,
  • Labor,
  • Social Science / Sociology / General,
  • Blue collar workers,
  • Anthropology - General,
  • Discrimination & Racism,
  • General,
  • African Americans,
  • Discrimination in employment

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages242
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7711757M
ISBN 100520239512
ISBN 109780520239517

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  From the time of Booker T. Washington to today, and William Julius Wilson, the advice dispensed to young black men has invariably been, Get a trade. Deirdre Royster has put this folk wisdom to an empirical test--and, in Race and the Invisible Hand, exposes the subtleties and discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white job-seeker over the black. “Invisible Hands is a brilliant, lucid, meticulously researched account of the politics of business conservatism. Kim Phillips-Fein’s work is pathbreaking. For anyone who wants to understand the triumph of the conservative order during the past quarter century, Invisible Hands is a must read.”Cited by: Race in America: The Invisible Hand of the Implicit Mind With Anthony Greenwald, co-author of Blindspot: The Hidden Biases of Good People. Posted Race and the Invisible Hand Racism is a social dilemma that has been dealt a frequent occurrence in the history of mankind. People have experienced different forms of racism and depending on what part of the world you lived in, many wars have been fought different ethnic and racial group.

The invisible hand which somehow tells that in the world of prices everything is intertwined with everything else sums up almost all that needs to be known in the science of economics. The movement of a price affects millions of prices and everything is in a continuous harmony and balance/5.   Race and the Invisible Hand is an important book that will be widely read and cited."—William Julius Wilson, author of The Bridge Over the Racial Divide"As acute in its analysis as it is rich in ethnographic detail, Royster's captivating study shows in telling detail how inequalities in the securing of good working class jobs are reproduced. The book is an easy listen however the central female character comes across as immature and childish making it difficult to connect with her. If you focus on that, she becomes annoying so I recommend listening to this just as a filler book and if it happens to be on sale. I'm a JP fan but this one didn't measure up to me. Book Review: Race and the Invisible Hand: How White Networks Exclude Black Men From Blue-Collar Jobs. Chris Tilly. Work and Occupations 2, Download Citation. If you have the appropriate software installed, you can download article citation data to the citation manager of your choice. Simply select your manager software from the Author: Chris Tilly.

About the book: From the time of Booker T. Washington to today, and William Julius Wilson, the advice dispensed to young black men has invariably been, "Get a trade." Deirdre Royster has put this folk wisdom to an empirical test and, in Race and the Invisible Hand, exposes the subtleties and discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white 3/5(1).   From the time of Booker T. Washington to today, and William Julius Wilson, the advice dispensed to young black men has invariably been, "Get a trade." Deirdre Royster has put this folk wisdom to an empirical test—and, in Race and the Invisible Hand, exposes the subtleties and discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white job-seeker over the black. Invisible hand, metaphor, introduced by the 18th-century Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith, that characterizes the mechanisms through which beneficial social and economic outcomes may arise from the accumulated self-interested actions of individuals, none of whom intends to bring about such outcomes. The notion of the invisible hand has been employed in economics and other social. In Invisible Man, race is a constant subject of a young black man in the middle of 20th century America, the narrator most often confronts the idea of race through experiencing the racism of others – from the degradation he experiences in the battle royal to his realization of his token role in the Brotherhood. However, the novel also explores the question of whether race might be.